View from the Camel Trail The Camel Trail Enjoy the Cornish countryside in a traffic-free environment The Coast Path Most of the trail is flat and accessible to all users Padstow Enjoy a cream tea or pasty at Padstow Harbour Stunning Sunsets Specially adapted bikes available, suitable for the less mobile trail user Family Friendly

Definitive Guide to the Camel Trail, Cornwall, UK  |  Cornwall's most popular multi-use trail route

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The Camel Trail is 17.3 miles long..

 

 

It is a resurfaced railway line..

 

 

The entire length is flat & therefore suitable for the disabled..

 

 

It's original use was to transport sand inland..

 

 

Only a small part of the trail is on roads and shared with normal traffic..

Padstow

> 50.53616°N -4.93399°W

 

Wenford Bridge

> 50.54427°N  -4.70297°W

Environmental Management:

envmanagement@cornwall.gov.uk

^^ click the image for a Cornwall Cycling Map

Cornwall Cycle Map

WADEBRIDGE

More information on Wadebridge

 

Wadebridge lies approximately 5 miles upstream from Padstow, making it a delightful cycle ride or walk on a glorious Cornish summers day.

 

Once you've made it to Wadebridge, depending on the weather of course, you may be in need of refreshments and you will find a number of cafes to choose from. Just head into the town from the trail and bear in mind most of the action only happens on one side of the river.

 

Incidentally, Wadebridge was once known simply as Wade. It was feared as quite a tricky crossing point over the River Camel until a bridge was first constructed here in the 15th century.  The early crossing had a chapel at either side of the river, where people would go to pray for a safe journey across. Thankfully, these days we can simply drive across it to head towards the north western part of Cornwall.

 

Here you may want to visit the John Betjemen Memorabilia room, displaying many personal items of his.

 

From Wadebridge you can head further on up the trail towards Dunmere at Bodmin, or head back to Padstow.

 

 

DID YOU KNOW..?

 

The bridge was a strategic position in the English Civil War as in 1646 Oliver Cromwell came with 500 Dragoons and 1,000 horsemen to take the bridge.

 

When the bridge was first completed tolls were charged for its maintenance.

 

In 1853 it was widened from 3 to 5 metres (9.8 to 16.4 ft). A second widening took place in 1952 and then in 1963 it was again widened taking it to 12 metres (39 ft).

click to enlarge

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Newquay Padstow (OS Explorer Map 106)